The war on cancer occurs at the bench and in the clinic, but the scientists fighting these battles must first be trained in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings. As much as anything, training the next generation of cancer researchers is critical to reducing the heavy burden of a cancer diagnosis.

There are a wide variety of undergraduate, pre- and post-doctoral training opportunities available in the laboratories of Huntsman Cancer Institute members. These training opportunities encompass basic science discovery, clinical investigation and population-based studies. Our goals are to understand cancer from its beginnings, to use this knowledge to create new and better treatments, to implement these strategies to improve outcomes and to learn from our efforts across populations to continually minimize the burdens of cancer.

Trainees flourish in a collaborative and collegial, multidisciplinary research environment under the guidance of experienced mentors. Currently, 136 cancer center members, spanning 27 academic departments, mentor 362 trainees in state-of-the-art research facilities.

HCI 2016-2017 Seminar Series

Recent News

HCI News

Carson Tahoe Health Opens New Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Care Clinic

Carson City, Nev. – Today, May 15, Carson Tahoe Cancer Center opened a new blood and bone marrow transplant care clinic with support from the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah. Under the collaboration, a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) physician and nurse from HCI will travel to Carson City once a month to treat patients both before and after they receive a transplant.

Read More

HCI News

Huntsman Cancer Institute and Intermountain Healthcare Launch Joint Cancer Care Program for Adolescents and Young Adults

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and Intermountain Cancer Centers announce a new collaboration today designed to meet the needs of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) between the ages of 15 and 39 who have been diagnosed with cancer. Each year over 1,000 adolescents and young adults in Utah are diagnosed with cancer, yet research has shown a number of gaps in their care.

Read More

Awards, Press Releases, In The Media, HCI News

Cognitive Stimulation, Social Interactions & Physical Activity Increase Lifespan in Mice with Colon Cancer

Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.

Read More