The war on cancer occurs at the bench and in the clinic, but the scientists fighting these battles must first be trained in classroom, laboratory and clinical settings. As much as anything, training the next generation of cancer researchers is critical to reducing the heavy burden of a cancer diagnosis. There are a wide variety of undergraduate, pre- and post-doctoral training opportunities available in the laboratories of Huntsman Cancer Institute members. These training opportunities encompass basic science discovery, clinical investigation and population-based studies. Our goals are to understand cancer from its beginnings, to use this knowledge to create new and better treatments, to implement these strategies to improve outcomes and to learn from our efforts across populations to continually minimize the burdens of cancer. Trainees flourish in a collaborative and collegial, multidisciplinary research environment under the guidance of experienced mentors. Currently, 136 cancer center members, spanning 27 academic departments, mentor 362 trainees in state-of-the-art research facilities.

HCI 2016-2017 Seminar Series

Recent News

News, In The Media

Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen Visit Huntsman Cancer Institute Patients and Staff

Actors Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen spent two hours visiting patients at Huntsman Cancer Institute on Sunday, January 22. The “Avengers: Age of Ultron” and “Captain America: Civil War” co-stars were in town promoting their Sundance film “Wind River.” Before flying back to Los Angeles, they took time to stop by the hospital and talk with cancer patients and staff.

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Press Releases, In The Media

Huntsman Cancer Institute Scientists Identify Bone Degradation Process Within Metastatic Breast Cancer

Once breast cancer spreads through the body, it can degrade a patient’s healthy bones, causing numerous problems. Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah have identified a new way that bones get destroyed through cancer. And they’ve also learned how to block that destruction with a new drug. Initial tests with patients show promising results.

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