Newsroom Navigation

Contact Info:
Office of Public Affairs
2000 Circle of Hope,
Salt Lake City, UT 84112

public.affairs@hci.utah.edu

801-587-7639

HCI News

Using the Patient’s Immune System to Treat One of the Deadliest Cancers
In The Media, HCI News

Using the Patient’s Immune System to Treat One of the Deadliest Cancers

Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that presents unique challenges for researchers. Clinical trials at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) are testing immunotherapy, medicines that stimulate the patient’s immune system, to boost the effects of standard chemotherapy drugs in treating pancreatic cancer.

Read More

Positive Side Effects: Your New Year’s Resolutions Could Reduce Your Cancer Risk
In The Media, HCI News

Positive Side Effects: Your New Year’s Resolutions Could Reduce Your Cancer Risk

For many of us, 2017’s New Year’s resolutions echo past resolutions we didn’t quite manage to keep. If your goals for 2017 include exercising more, eating better and cutting back on smoking or drinking, the experts at Huntsman Cancer Institute have some information that could help inspire success: these changes are also an integral part of protecting yourself against cancer.

Read More

Enough is Enough: Choosing the Right Treatment for Thyroid Cancer
In The Media, HCI News

Enough is Enough: Choosing the Right Treatment for Thyroid Cancer

When it comes to treating thyroid cancer, less can be more. The adage certainly proved true for Lisa Anderson. After the mother of one was diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer, doctors at Huntsman Cancer Institute assessed her risk to decide which treatment would be most effective for her.

Read More

Holidays are Family Time: To Stay Healthy, Talk More than Turkey
In The Media, HCI News

Holidays are Family Time: To Stay Healthy, Talk More than Turkey

Sara learned she had a rare form of gastrointestinal cancer at the age of 37. She told her family and just a few weeks later, her brother had a check-up. His doctors found he had stage 4 colon cancer. Surprised and shaken by the coinciding diagnoses, Sara and her family turned to Samantha Greenberg, a genetic counselor at Huntsman Cancer Institute for answers.

Read More

New progress against melanoma with trial therapies
In The Media, HCI News

New progress against melanoma with trial therapies

Melanoma is the most serious form of skin cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, when melanoma is caught early, there’s a 5-year survival rate of about 97%. Once the cancer spreads to other organs, the survival rate drops to 15–20%.

Read More

Targeted therapies offer hope for a hard-to-treat cancer
In The Media, HCI News

Targeted therapies offer hope for a hard-to-treat cancer

Diane Fouts thought she had a bad cold. It was the spring of 2015, and she had a cough that just wouldn’t go away. She went to see her doctor, who ordered a CT scan. The results were far more serious than a cold. Diane had lung cancer. She is not a smoker; in fact, she has never smoked.

Read More

The social aspect of cancer care
In The Media, HCI News

The social aspect of cancer care

Like any major illness, cancer affects more than the body. It wreaks havoc on the lives and emotions of patients and their families. Ask Judi Evans, who was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer and told she had just six months to live. “My daughter and I looked at each other, and we said ‘no, we're not accepting that.’ So we immediately came to Huntsman Cancer Institute.”

Read More

Massage therapy helps rub out stress for cancer patients
In The Media, HCI News

Massage therapy helps rub out stress for cancer patients

Sometimes a therapy not often associated with cancer care can make a huge difference in a patient’s recovery. Massage therapy at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) complements standard cancer treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. One patient says it’s improving his quality of life dramatically.

Read More

Telephones: Simple technology can improve cancer treatment
In The Media, HCI News

Telephones: Simple technology can improve cancer treatment

People use phones for just about everything these days—reading emails, checking the weather, or catching up on news. Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) want to add extended patient care to that list. They’re testing a telehealth system called “Symptom Care at Home” to help keep patients as healthy as possible during cancer treatment. Kathi Mooney, PhD, co-leader of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at HCI, says the idea behind the program is that cancer patients’ symptoms don’t happen only while they are at the doctor’s office. Dr. Mooney has spent 15 years trying to improve patient care through a relatively simple technology—the telephone.

Read More

Minimizing the side effects of cancer therapy
In The Media, HCI News

Minimizing the side effects of cancer therapy

It's a familiar struggle to anyone dealing with cancer; the treatments that get rid of the disease can also have serious side effects. Doctors at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) are working to reduce the negative effects of cancer treatment by pinpointing radiation therapy within a millimeter of where the cancer resides. Karen Curtis has a family history of cancer. The disease took the lives of her mother and sister. When she was diagnosed with cervical cancer last February, she assumed she didn't have much time to live. "The first time I found out I didn't cry, I didn't have any emotions about it," she says. "But, then you start going through it and you start losing your hair, and you start losing everything, it's like you're losing your dignity."

Read More

HCI researchers work to improve childhood cancer treatments
In The Media, HCI News

HCI researchers work to improve childhood cancer treatments

Lilli Hartvigsen remembers the moment her three-year-old son Ethan was diagnosed with cancer. “On November 7th, three weeks after he had an MRI, they told us it was lymphoma,” she says. It began as a limp and quickly became a parent’s worst nightmare. “They actually did a bone scan, and it was all over his bones,” Lilli explains, “Stage 4 cancer. It was terrible.”

Read More

Treatment for skin cancer helps stop thyroid cancer
HCI News

Treatment for skin cancer helps stop thyroid cancer

Doctors at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) are discovering some treatments that work for one type of cancer may also work for another, if it has similar mutations, or genetic changes. Genetic changes, or mutations, change some normal cells in the body into cancer cells which can grow and multiply. There are more than 100 types of cancer, which means many different ways to treat cancer are needed. Most cancers are named for the part of the body where they started.

Read More

Lynch syndrome research could prevent cancer deaths
In The Media, HCI News

Lynch syndrome research could prevent cancer deaths

Cancer isn’t the first hardship dealt to Carrie Grindle-Lyons. In 2008, she delivered a baby boy at 22 weeks. He was stillborn. Her doctor asked her not to try getting pregnant again right away because she had fibroids in her uterus. They were removed with surgery that left her uterus in place. A year after she lost her baby, Carrie went in for a checkup. What doctors found devastated her. “The fibroids grew back, and they found out I had endometrial cancer,” she says.

Read More

Tiny needles make big impact on quality of life for cancer patients
In The Media, HCI News

Tiny needles make big impact on quality of life for cancer patients

To say Annie Budhathoki, DAOM, L.Ac., was skeptical of acupuncture would be an understatement. “I thought acupuncture was the devil’s work,” she says. Then she was in a horrific accident. After more than two years of surgeries and recovery, she still had to walk with a cane. She turned to acupuncture as a last resort to relieve the pain in her leg, and quickly became a believer. After three sessions she was able to walk, cane-free.

Read More

A vaccine prevents cancer, yet few use it
In The Media, HCI News

A vaccine prevents cancer, yet few use it

Thousands of lives could be saved by a simple vaccination to protect against Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Yet only 51% of teens receive the vaccine each year. Every year more than four thousand people die from cancers related to HPV. It's upsetting, it's really upsetting,” says Deanna Kepka, PhD, MPH, a population scientist at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). “If you ask any cancer survivor whether they would have taken an opportunity to get a vaccine that prevented their cancer, they would say yes.”

Read More

Therapy on four legs
In The Media, HCI News

Therapy on four legs

Every week, a special visitor appears at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). His job? To cheer up patients fighting cancer and their family members. His name is Misio, and he’s a therapy dog with Intermountain Therapy Animals. Kathy McNulty, a volunteer with the organization, is Misio’s escort. Kathy says Misio has only been coming to HCI for a few months, but she can already see the difference he’s making for patients and their families. “Over and over, I’ve seen tears turn to smiles,” she says. “Misio takes their minds off the procedures.”

Read More


Our media relations representatives are here to help reporters Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Tonya Papanikolas
Public Affairs Manager
Phone: 801-587-7639
tonya.papanikolas@hci.utah.edu

Amie Parker
Public Relations Associate
Phone: 801-213-5755
amie.parker@hci.utah.edu

Jill Woods
Administrative Assistant
Phone: 801-585-5321
Fax: 801-585-0900
jill.woods@hci.utah.edu

After-hours calls: Reporters calling before or after business hours on an urgent matter can page the University of Utah Health Sciences on-call media relations representative at 801-581-7387 and press 1.