Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) is part of University of Utah Health. Every year, HCI serves thousands of cancer patients from Utah and the surrounding states. HCI also teaches and trains future doctors, nurses, and scientists. HCI is the only National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Center in the Mountain West. This means it meets the highest national standards for cancer care and research and receives support for its scientific endeavors.

HCI is also a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), a not-for-profit alliance of the world’s leading cancer centers. NCCN is dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer.

Thank You for Choosing HCI

We work hard to make sure you have an exceptional experience with the best possible results. We listen and respond to what you and other patients tell us. It is our mission to understand cancer from its beginnings, to use that knowledge in the creation and improvement of cancer treatments, to relieve the suffering of cancer patients, and to provide education about cancer risk, prevention, and care.

Recent News

HCI News

Carson Tahoe Health Opens New Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Care Clinic

Carson City, Nev. – Today, May 15, Carson Tahoe Cancer Center opened a new blood and bone marrow transplant care clinic with support from the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah. Under the collaboration, a Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) physician and nurse from HCI will travel to Carson City once a month to treat patients both before and after they receive a transplant.

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HCI News

Huntsman Cancer Institute and Intermountain Healthcare Launch Joint Cancer Care Program for Adolescents and Young Adults

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah and Intermountain Cancer Centers announce a new collaboration today designed to meet the needs of adolescents and young adults (AYAs) between the ages of 15 and 39 who have been diagnosed with cancer. Each year over 1,000 adolescents and young adults in Utah are diagnosed with cancer, yet research has shown a number of gaps in their care.

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Awards, Press Releases, In The Media, HCI News

Cognitive Stimulation, Social Interactions & Physical Activity Increase Lifespan in Mice with Colon Cancer

Living in a stimulating environment has a wide range of health benefits in humans and has even been shown to fight cancer in mice, but the underlying mechanisms have been unclear. A study published April 25 in Cell Reports reveals that cognitive stimulation, social interactions, and physical activity increase lifespan in mice with colon cancer by triggering the body's wound repair response.

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